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H&R Block

H&R Block is one of the world's largest tax services providers, utilizing more than 100,000 highly trained tax professionals and having prepared more than 550 million tax returns worldwide since 1955. Brothers Henry W. Bloch and Richard A. Bloch founded the company in 1955 and grew the business to become a brand and franchising icon. View Video: - H&R Block Tax Preparer Course Today, H&R Block: Prepares 1 in every 7 U.S. tax returns Has a retail office within 5 miles of most Americans Delivers customized tax advice for more than 400 occupations Has helped clients obtain more than $50 billion in tax refunds, credits and other government benefits in fiscal 2010 In addition to the company providing tax return preparation services in-person, through H&R Block At Home™ online and desktop software products, and through other channels, the company offers financial products to support its tax business through the H&R Block Bank. As the company has evolved and achieved significant milestones, H&R Block has remained committed to the factors that led to its success: superior customer service, a pledge to stand behind our work and a commitment to serving clients where they prefer to be reached — in a retail office, online, using software or a combination of methods. H&R Block is dedicated to being the most trusted, state-of-the-art tax preparation firm at the best value. H&R Block also is proud of the rich philanthropic tradition established by Henry and Richard Bloch. Their legacies live on in all of our philanthropic efforts.
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Barbara Cassidy

I've worked for H&R Block for 13 years, I was recruited through AARP's senior program. I loved it and never felt any age discrimination. As a matter of fact, because of my KPMG background, i was looked at aa very experienced asset to the company.

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Anonymous

I have my CPA which was a plus for HR Block. After working for two years at HR Block and bringing clients to HR Block, they want to reduce my hourly rate. In addition, the local HR Block office created a hostile work environment. If I had wanted to pursue legal action, it was likely that I could have won. I believe that I was punished by HR Block for sending an email to my district supervisor about the hostile work environment and they did nothing about the situation. For the tax knowledge that HR Block expects, they pay peanuts.

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Anonymous

I completed nine tax seasons as a Tax Professional with H&R Block. Tax Season 2018 will be number ten. It is a very good place to work for a semi-retired person who likes working with clients and who is detailed orientated. Compensation is based on one's level of experience, certification, and production. I am 73 years old and an IRS Enrolled Agent. H&R Block allows a tax professional to work as little or as much as one desires during tax season.

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ANTHONY BATES

H&R Block's workplace environment and company values is outstanding when it comes to family values, and welcoming and supporting workers age 50+ and older.

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Anonymous

The Manager I had liked me. However, her talk was so unprofessional for a business office! There was complaint(s) made about her to upper level management, nothing done about it. Work hours here terrible. Manager put too many people on for this job I was doing. And therefore cut my hours to near nothing. Crazy hours too! Way too many classes to take for a person not doing taxes.

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Anonymous

Employs many retirees; compensation is based on experience and acquired skills; opportunity for increased compensation is available to all who are willing to put in the time to learn

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Anonymous

Pro: Very friendly to people over age 50. Employs many retirees; compensation is based on experience and acquired skills; opportunity for increased compensation is available to all who are willing to put in the time to learn. Con: Bias in giving out work hours, workload.

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Anonymous

The employees & management are so snooty actually believing that they are better than others. Managers have already made up their minds on who they will include in their circle & it resonates across age, sex, & race. I did not have a chance as a temporary worker thus they discarded employees like garbage.

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Anonymous

In 2009 they laid of 40% of US based jobs and sent them to India. Once everyone in India was trained they closed the building we were in (US) and laid us all off. We were told there would be Employee Assistance, there was none. Most people in my building were a year away from qualifying for retirement, they lost their retirements. The head office manager who closed our building had the nerve to show up at our last Christmas party, very cold. The CEO was the first in line to collect government bail out money, this after laying off over 300K US based employees. They posted US based jobs in the break room stating could not be a US citizen to qualify. Cold place, not sure how upper management can sleep at night.

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Anonymous

If you are in your 50s, unless you are recommended by an ED or MD or the CEO himself your chances will be slim to none to get the job.

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Castiner GOGGINS

After being an employee of Chase for years, I was laid off, and needless to say over 40. I was temporarily employed in a few places before I decided to try another position at Chase. I was treated harshly after turning up for an interview, at the office on 42nd and Broadway. This was a few years ago, but the Branch Manager( a young women in her 30’s), told me I would need to be evaluated through the website and if hired, I wouldn’t have a desk but would have to walk the vestibule in search of customers. Needless to say I left. Why does Chase appear on this list as age Friendly? With Friends like this ...............!

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Anonymous

Walking the floors of JPMorgan in NYC, you can easily see that age discrimination is the norm. At a recent town hall senior management mentioned the recent “young” new hires and the goal to hire more. Walking through those revolving doors at 9AM you will see 6 out 10 staff members who are under 30 and walking down the many aisles of high efficiency workstations you will probably find someone 50 and older about 15 stations deep. And most likely the 50’ish is probably an analysist; senior analysists or vice presidents over 60 are few and far between. The joke is the new performance appraisal, built around career paths and the unspoken rule that you should move into a new role every 18 to 24 months. Anyone in the 50 to 60 age, while told they are the backbone of the company and seen as subject matter experts, (SME), are stuck with an “M” rating year after year and told “M” is the norm, and not a negative. Moving to a new role is a political game and posting is a joke. Unless you have connections, you will never get your foot in the door. As soon as they do the mental calculations: (current year – degree year) < than 50 your resume is tossed and you receive a notice that you are not qualified and take more training. And here you are the backbone of the company and an SME being rejected while your 26 year old colleague gets the job!

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Anonymous

I've applied to almost 100 jobs at local JP Morgan Chase locations, but never received even one phone call. Younger colleagues do get interviews, and are hired.

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Anonymous

They eliminated everyone since the chase takeover in 2006 at age 50 + some younger I being one in the 50 + Group. not age friendly at all

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Anonymous

Older workers are too expensive Their benefits impact margins in every division except the very senior levels Experience means judgement and possibly resistance to change because youth means malleability

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Anonymous

If you are over 50 and you or a family member actually uses your health insurance, you are laid off in the next wave of "reductions." Then you have to sign a statement that you will not sue Chase for ageism. My "team" of 7 was reduced to 3, me being one of the lay-offs, and we all had the same thing in common: over 50 and using our health insurance benefits.

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Anonymous

Recently, Chase terminated several dozen attorneys -- all of them were over the age of 40.

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Anonymous

Have seen time and again that when employee positions are outsourced, eliminated while on leave of absence or lost through downsizing, the Employee Assistance programs available to help find new positions are a joke. While these programs look good on paper, they really do nothing to assist older employees in finding new positions within the company.

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Anonymous

It seems that men in the company are mire likely to stay after age 55 then women.

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Anonymous

They hired me at age 65.

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Liberty Mutual Insurance

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Anonymous

They hire young college graduates and interns. Once you been with them many years and have higher end pay scale they do everything they can to push you out so they can get young people in at lesser pay.

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Testimonials:

After reading the comments by those who express their perspective of age related discriminating practices by more than a few employers, I felt very concerned for older workers that need/desire employment. I wonder if these employers understand that it is not just the revenue from young adults that keep them in business. I wonder how they would survive if the older generation would stop supporting their businesses. I also wonder if these employers understand the principle of sowing and reaping? I am grateful to your agency for providing the results of your survey and your commitment to provide older workers with reliable job leads.

-- Marie Moore, AARP